Review of Dell UltraSharp 27 (U2717D) 

Monitors

The Good The Dell UltraSharp 27 (U2717D) is bright, with good resolution and color quality.

The Bad Feels a bit lightly built.

The Bottom Line It’s not the most popular monitor for money, but the Dell UltraSharp 27 (U2717D) is a great all-purpose display.

7.8 Overall

  • Design
    8
  • Features
    7
  • Performance
    8

The Dell UltraSharp U2717D is essentially a larger version UltraSharp 24 U2417D , but it does offer higher resolution Quad HD with a slightly better pixel density, and I think both make a noticeable improvement. Although the 24-inch model is nice, the 27-inch is a bit clearer and gives a nontrivial increase in screen space while maintaining the same level of performance.

Dell sells the U2717D for $ 570 (£ 700, $ 850) with a standard bracket, but you can find it closer to $ 450 (£ 500, $ 650), which is much better than its specs and features. You can also get it with the hand I liked when I tested the U2417HA for $ 630 (£ 710). Dell Australia doesn’t seem to be selling it with the option on hand. Note that the U2717D sounds a lot like the older UltraSharp 27 (UP2716D), but this model has a more accurate color panel and 100% Adobe RGB coverage – the “P” in this model’s name means “PremierColor” – plus the $ 900 price tag (£ 855, $ 1,160). Don’t buy the wrong one!

Main technical characteristics

Manufacturer price Starts at $570, £700, AU$850
Size (diagonal) 27
Resolution QHD
(2,560×1,440)
Aspect ratio 16:9
Panel type IPS
Backlight type LED
Maximum gamut 99 percent sRGB
Rotates vertically Yes
Bit depth 8
Typical brightness (nits) 350
Selectable color spaces sRGB
MHL (Mobile High-definition Link) support Yes
HDMI 1 x 1.4
USB 3.0 (out) 4 x USB 3.0 (1 x BC 1.2)
USB 3.0 (in) 1
DisplayPort 1 x 1.4 (out), 1 x 1.2 (in)
Release date February 2016

Most monitor settings do build the base; in addition, you mount the display on the base and make the appropriate connections. The U2727D comes with two cables, a USB 3.0 cable that connects to your computer to turn on the USB Display Hub and the DisplayPort-Mini-MiniPort cable. If you have a recent laptop to which you want to connect it, you may need to use HDMI, and you will be able to find a high-current USB-C full-current laptop cable for full-size split streaming – this is a double-high version, so your computer needs an A-type connector. Depending on the operating system you are running, you may need to download a driver to turn on the hub.

Assemble the stand and install the display easily. You just lower the vertical mount to the base and screw it in with your thumb. The backrest of the VESA display is simply inserted into the stand. You feed the cables through the hole in the back. It rotates and tilts smoothly, even with one hand, including 90 degree rotation for vertical use or for pulling the connectors sideways so you can see them. There is also a great latitude for height adjustment.

A factory calibration report is provided on the monitor to assure that the tolerances should be considered color accuracy within the standard unit of tangible difference called “Delta-E”. In sRGB this is very accurate; Although this is not the case in standard default mode. maximum brightness of about 320 bolts and typical contrast of about 700: 1; In other words, it delivers great public metrics. It also has an anti-glare coating that works quite well.

My one weirdo is the build quality of the plastic feel. This feels like one wrong move and the panel is about to pop out of the thin InfinityEdge panel; I doubt it will, but it feels that way. The buttons are small but relatively easy to feel, and the OSD offers a small but smart set of options. The power connection seems a little weak; several times while moving the monitor it relaxed enough to turn off the power even when I tried to hold it. This is not a big deal for most people – just reposition it and everything is fine – but in my very unusual case, I had to restart my virtual machine every time the power was turned off.

The feature set is also quite thin; its main benefit is the four USB 3.0 Type-A connectors. There is an audio output on the back, but it does not support it headphones , and the monitor offers a minimum of connectivity options. You can set some color temperatures, but it’s nice. This is not a great option for fast games – there are better budget gaming monitors – or for color tasks such as photo and video editing. But for work, web surfing, and HD streaming, it’s a solid choice.

It has a lot of competitors, though some are cheaper (like the BenQ GW2765HT for about $ 330) or offer a lot more for a similar price (like the Freesync 4K UHD LG 27UD68P for $ 500, £ 400, $ 680 ).

If you can afford it, I recommend choosing a 27-inch 24-inch UltraSharp, especially if it is your only monitor. It’s worth this space and a little extra sharpness.

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