Is HP ZBook x2 G4 safe for office

Laptops

The Good The DreamColor matte screen, matched with the HP ZBook x2 G4 Adobe RGB, is much more useful than a typical gloss panel, and combined with 4,096 levels of Wacom EMR pressure sensitivity, provides brushes that feel more natural than most work. It’s also powerful in size, relatively full-featured, and has a removable Bluetooth keyboard for typing.

The Bad You are only limited by one button stylus, it is relatively heavy, and although battery life is good for its components, it will not get you through the day.

The Bottom Line As long as you don’t limit yourself to stylus and satisfy your cost, the HP ZBook x2 G4 DreamColor delivers accurate colors and smooth sketches with workstation reliability.

8.2 Overall

  • Design
    8
  • Features
    9
  • Performance
    8
  • Battery
    8

If I had to describe the HP ZBook x2 G4 in one sentence, it had to be “It’s like Microsoft Surface Pro and its competitors, but much better. “

The mobile workstation didn’t bother me so much when I first saw it – I really thought it had a 10-bit panel – but it’s still a great solution for a select group, especially heavy users of Adobe Creative Cloud applications. People who need full Adobe RGB gamut coverage and color profile profiling; who want great pressure sensitivity and a digital brush feel; and who need a workstation graphics processor to either run certified applications along with workstation class protection, or include 10-bit color support in applications such as Photoshop. And who can afford all of the above. Some restrictions, however, can narrow this club a little.

Now, your 1500 words why.

Adobe RGB FTW

The 14-inch 4K touchscreen comes in two versions: one with DreamColor, one without. The DreamColor versions are factory-calibrated for accurate Adobe RGB, and this is certainly great: beyond the Delta E 2000, it has repeatedly measured well below 2, the white dot averages about 6 730K (span height, but within 4 percent of D65). a peak brightness of 340 bolts and a black level of 0.23 bolts (but at 100 percent screen brightness) with a contrast ratio of 1,500: 1 and a pure 2.2 gamma curve. (We test using Calman 5 Ultimate and X-Rite i1Display Pro.)

HP ZBook x2 G4

Price as reviewed $3,622.32
Display size/resolution 14-inch 3,840 x 2,160 DreamColor display
PC CPU 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U
PC Memory 32GB DDR5 SDRAM 2,400MHz
Graphics 2GB Nvidia Quadro M620
Storage 512GB SSD, SD card slot
Ports 1x USB 3.0 Type-A, 2x USB-C/Thunderbolt, 1x HDMI 2.0
Networking 802.11ac 2×2, Bluetooth 4.2
Operating system Windows 10 Professional (64-bit)
Weight 4.9 lbs/2.2 kg

DreamColor comes with profiles for sRGB / BT.709, DCI-P3, DICOM and even native, but the display covers only 90 percent of P3 and is calibrated to DCI-P3 theater, not the D65 P3 display standard. In addition, at HP, entering off-panel calibration targets is not working right now, but it is working on a software fix.

There are tablets that can exceed the color gamut, including the P3 iPad Pro , but there is no system color calibration or hardware calibration in any of them.

Although it uses 10-bit color calculations and is fairly accurate, it’s still an 8-bit IPS panel that uses frame rate control to simulate 10 bits. (HP refers to IPS panels as “Wide Angle of View” or UWVA.) You can connect it to a better external monitor via HDMI or Thunderbolt 3 when you need more gamut and finer colors than Adobe RGB colors. This is another reason why hardware profiles are so important. This is the only way to ensure that profiles for built-in and external displays use the correct profiles. As with most DreamColor solutions, profile calibration equipment works only with X-Rite i1 units.

I’ve seen some complaints of bleeding backlighting, but it’s no worse than any I’ve seen – and given the built-in Wacom EMR layer, it’s probably harder to manage than usual. I tried the evenness in the corners and it wasn’t too bad.

Smooth strokes

Another notable aspect of the x2 is support for the Wacom EMR, as well as a Wacom / HP pen for custom HP Pen with 4,996 pressure levels. One of the main benefits of EMR is that the stylus draws its energy from the screen, not from the AAA battery. This is not particularly novel; Samsung, for example, uses technology.

But the HP display is chemically etched for two purposes: it adds a bit more screen friction for a more natural, accurate feel and significantly reduces glare. In a sea of ​​glossy tablet screens, this is an oasis of the visual mind. Keep in mind that anti-glare does not match anti-reflection. Working on Starbucks with a lap tablet, the light shining from above made it almost as difficult to use as a typical glossy display.

And it feels as responsive as its real competitor, Wacom MobileStudioPro, with a similar matte display and the latest generation of Wacom technology for 8,192 pressure levels. Some people find this too much and require too much adjustment of the pressure curves to respond to light touch. After climbing so high, you get into the realm of personal preference, unless you need serious detailed control over the blows. Pen, screen friction and some delay can affect your experience more.

As for the delay, it depends on the program. This is felt instantly in programs with fast brush algorithms. Then there is Photoshop, which has a backlog of complex brushes, no matter what equipment you throw at it. The stylus also responds well to tilting; Admittedly, I never got into rotation testing, but it should work fine too.

The 14-inch HP feels a bit less cumbersome than the 16-inch MobileStudioPro, and although the 13-inch is a better size, it doesn’t offer the option of a 4K display. HP’s 4K display works at a screen density of 315 pixels per inch, great for combating ultra-thin strokes. But it is also heavy, just under 5 pounds / 2.2 kg.

The sides of the display include programmable QuickKeys that you’ll be familiar with if you use Wacom Cintiq or ExpressKeys Intuos Pro software. (And seriously, why the default for Photoshop Undo instead of taking a step back?). This is another great advantage over more consumer-oriented tablets.

Unfortunately, there is one horrible, horrible, not good, very bad drawback for some people who are otherwise an accurate buyer for this: it only works with an HP stylus that has only one button. This means that at best you will have to learn some habits and at worst make it unsuitable for your needs if they run up to an airbrush or a three-button handle to work in 3D. The touchpad is pretty cool, but it’s a common consumer touchpad without the plethora of buttons on powerful mobile workstations.

HP ZBook x2, a detachable designed for the creative class

Overall, it is well designed, though the industrial design may not be to everyone’s taste. The removable keyboard is rigid, with keystrokes and feedback sufficient for easy typing. Plus, its high quality plastic backrest doesn’t appeal to schmutz. Or cat fur. It is resistant to ink and can tilt to a low angle. As this is a removable module, you remove the magnet-attached keyboard to turn it into a tablet and it is easy to reconnect via Bluetooth for use during separation. This is great for applications where your muscle memory insists on keyboard shortcuts.

Finally, the price

This would usually be one of the first things I talk about. But you have to think if it delivers what you need before evaluating “wow, this is expensive”. Because it is far more than any consumer setting, even after you specify the main Surface Pro add-ons, such as the keyboard and stylus, which add at least $ 230 to the price.

Pre-configured HP models start at $ 2,280 in the US; it’s for the Core i7-7600U with 8GB of RAM and 128GB SSD. Although all systems come with the Quadro M620 – ignore the i5 / iGPU configuration option, I have no idea why it exists – they all do not have a DreamColor calibrated display. However, DreamColor support only costs $ 175, so if you care about color profiling, it’s worth it.

Models with 8th-generation i7-8650U processors start at $ 2,900, with at least 16GB of RAM and 512GB or 1TB SSD. You can also set it from scratch, but this $ 2900 model configuration looks pretty good to me if someone else does not support the account. For video editing, you may want to increase the storage capacity of the SSD 1 TB Z Turbo Drive, which will add up to $ 420 in value.

Our evaluation model was not the standard configuration – we had 32GB, not 16GB, the $ 3400 version. In Australia, there are no eighth generation Core i options, at least not yet, so the closest configuration has the same memory and RAM but the i7-7600U for $ 6,860. And then there is no 1TB option in the UK, and you have to choose between 16GB of 512GB SSD or 32GB and 256GB SSD, plus there is only the i7-7600U at the moment. The 16GB / 512GB model runs £ 3,556 but is not available; The 256GB 256GB model, the only model available, costs around £ 3,710.

It’s worth the extra money for seventh-generation processors, at least because they probably provide the best battery life – and that’s what it takes. I suspect that Quadro GPUs consume a lot of power, and integrated workstations rarely give up on workstations to extend the battery life, which has been tested for almost five hours. This is not a bad thing for a tablet with discrete graphics and a 4K display, but it’s a small consolation when traveling abroad.

Finally, its performance is very good against full laptops, although I don’t have much data to compare (we didn’t run the Cinebench tests that are relevant here on a fair number of competing systems). In practice, it felt as fast as a typical mid-range desktop. This is one of the trade-offs in terms of size and flexibility. But it never got warm, which is also important.

Battery drain test for video streaming

Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 984 Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 643 Microsoft Surface Pro 505 HP ZBook x2 G4 283 Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 243 Microsoft Surface Book 2 Tablet Partition (15 inches) 239

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance (in minutes)

Geekbench 4 (multi-core)

Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 15973 HP ZBook x2 G4 15060 Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 12940 Microsoft Surface Pro 8845 Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 3707

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

Cinebench R15 OpenGL

HP ZBook x2 G4 107.17 Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 91.19

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance (FPS)

Cinebench R15 processor (multi-core)

Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 764 Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 691 HP ZBook x2 G4 524

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

System configurations

Apple MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (15-inch, 2017) Apple macOS Sierra 10.12.5; 2.9GHz Intel Core i7-7820HQ; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 2,133MHz; 4GB Radeon Pro 560 / 1,536MB Intel HD Graphics 630; 512GB SSD
HP ZBook x2 G4 Microsoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U; 32GB DDR5 SDRAM 2,400MHz; 2GB Nvidia Quadro M620; 512GB SSD
Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U; 16GB DDR4 SDRAM 1,866MHz; 6GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 ; 1TB SSD
Microsoft Surface Pro Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-7600U; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,866MHz; 128MB (dedicated) Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640; 512GB SSD
Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 3.3GHz Intel Core i7-6567U; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,600MHz; 4GB Nvidia Quadro M1000M; 512GB SSD

If I had to describe the HP ZBook x2 G4 in one sentence, it had to be “It’s like Microsoft Surface Pro and its competitors, but much better. “

The mobile workstation didn’t bother me so much when I first saw it – I really thought it had a 10-bit panel – but it’s still a great solution for a select group, especially heavy users of Adobe Creative Cloud applications. People who need full Adobe RGB gamut coverage and color profile profiling; who want great pressure sensitivity and a digital brush feel; and who need a workstation graphics processor to either run certified applications along with workstation class protection, or include 10-bit color support in applications such as Photoshop. And who can afford all of the above. Some restrictions, however, can narrow this club a little.

Now, your 1500 words why.

Adobe RGB FTW

The 14-inch 4K touchscreen comes in two versions: one with DreamColor, one without. The DreamColor versions are factory-calibrated for accurate Adobe RGB, and this is certainly great: beyond the Delta E 2000, it has repeatedly measured well below 2, the white dot averages about 6 730K (span height, but within 4 percent of D65). a peak brightness of 340 bolts and a black level of 0.23 bolts (but at 100 percent screen brightness) with a contrast ratio of 1,500: 1 and a pure 2.2 gamma curve. (We test using Calman 5 Ultimate and X-Rite i1Display Pro.)

HP ZBook x2 G4

Price as reviewed $3,622.32
Display size/resolution 14-inch 3,840 x 2,160 DreamColor display
PC CPU 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U
PC Memory 32GB DDR5 SDRAM 2,400MHz
Graphics 2GB Nvidia Quadro M620
Storage 512GB SSD, SD card slot
Ports 1x USB 3.0 Type-A, 2x USB-C/Thunderbolt, 1x HDMI 2.0
Networking 802.11ac 2×2, Bluetooth 4.2
Operating system Windows 10 Professional (64-bit)
Weight 4.9 lbs/2.2 kg

DreamColor comes with profiles for sRGB / BT.709, DCI-P3, DICOM and even native, but the display covers only 90 percent of P3 and is calibrated to DCI-P3 theater, not the D65 P3 display standard. In addition, at HP, entering off-panel calibration targets is not working right now, but it is working on a software fix.

There are tablets that can exceed the color gamut, including the P3 iPad Pro , but there is no system color calibration or hardware calibration in any of them.

Although it uses 10-bit color calculations and is fairly accurate, it’s still an 8-bit IPS panel that uses frame rate control to simulate 10 bits. (HP refers to IPS panels as “Wide Angle of View” or UWVA.) You can connect it to a better external monitor via HDMI or Thunderbolt 3 when you need more gamut and finer colors than Adobe RGB colors. This is another reason why hardware profiles are so important. This is the only way to ensure that profiles for built-in and external displays use the correct profiles. As with most DreamColor solutions, profile calibration equipment works only with X-Rite i1 units.

I’ve seen some complaints of bleeding backlighting, but it’s no worse than any I’ve seen – and given the built-in Wacom EMR layer, it’s probably harder to manage than usual. I tried the evenness in the corners and it wasn’t too bad.

Smooth strokes

Another notable aspect of the x2 is support for the Wacom EMR, as well as a Wacom / HP pen for custom HP Pen with 4,996 pressure levels. One of the main benefits of EMR is that the stylus draws its energy from the screen, not from the AAA battery. This is not particularly novel; Samsung, for example, uses technology.

But the HP display is chemically etched for two purposes: it adds a bit more screen friction for a more natural, accurate feel and significantly reduces glare. In a sea of ​​glossy tablet screens, this is an oasis of the visual mind. Keep in mind that anti-glare does not match anti-reflection. Working on Starbucks with a lap tablet, the light shining from above made it almost as difficult to use as a typical glossy display.

And it feels as responsive as its real competitor, Wacom MobileStudioPro, with a similar matte display and the latest generation of Wacom technology for 8,192 pressure levels. Some people find this too much and require too much adjustment of the pressure curves to respond to light touch. After climbing so high, you get into the realm of personal preference, unless you need serious detailed control over the blows. Pen, screen friction and some delay can affect your experience more.

As for the delay, it depends on the program. This is felt instantly in programs with fast brush algorithms. Then there is Photoshop, which has a backlog of complex brushes, no matter what equipment you throw at it. The stylus also responds well to tilting; Admittedly, I never got into rotation testing, but it should work fine too.

The 14-inch HP feels a bit less cumbersome than the 16-inch MobileStudioPro, and although the 13-inch is a better size, it doesn’t offer the option of a 4K display. HP’s 4K display works at a screen density of 315 pixels per inch, great for combating ultra-thin strokes. But it is also heavy, just under 5 pounds / 2.2 kg.

The sides of the display include programmable QuickKeys that you’ll be familiar with if you use Wacom Cintiq or ExpressKeys Intuos Pro software. (And seriously, why the default for Photoshop Undo instead of taking a step back?). This is another great advantage over more consumer-oriented tablets.

Unfortunately, there is one horrible, horrible, not good, very bad drawback for some people who are otherwise an accurate buyer for this: it only works with an HP stylus that has only one button. This means that at best you will have to learn some habits and at worst make it unsuitable for your needs if they run up to an airbrush or a three-button handle to work in 3D. The touchpad is pretty cool, but it’s a common consumer touchpad without the plethora of buttons on powerful mobile workstations.

HP ZBook x2, a detachable designed for the creative class

Overall, it is well designed, though the industrial design may not be to everyone’s taste. The removable keyboard is rigid, with keystrokes and feedback sufficient for easy typing. Plus, its high quality plastic backrest doesn’t appeal to schmutz. Or cat fur. It is resistant to ink and can tilt to a low angle. As this is a removable module, you remove the magnet-attached keyboard to turn it into a tablet and it is easy to reconnect via Bluetooth for use during separation. This is great for applications where your muscle memory insists on keyboard shortcuts.

Finally, the price

This would usually be one of the first things I talk about. But you have to think if it delivers what you need before evaluating “wow, this is expensive”. Because it is far more than any consumer setting, even after you specify the main Surface Pro add-ons, such as the keyboard and stylus, which add at least $ 230 to the price.

Pre-configured HP models start at $ 2,280 in the US; it’s for the Core i7-7600U with 8GB of RAM and 128GB SSD. Although all systems come with the Quadro M620 – ignore the i5 / iGPU configuration option, I have no idea why it exists – they all do not have a DreamColor calibrated display. However, DreamColor support only costs $ 175, so if you care about color profiling, it’s worth it.

Models with 8th-generation i7-8650U processors start at $ 2,900, with at least 16GB of RAM and 512GB or 1TB SSD. You can also set it from scratch, but this $ 2900 model configuration looks pretty good to me if someone else does not support the account. For video editing, you may want to increase the storage capacity of the SSD 1 TB Z Turbo Drive, which will add up to $ 420 in value.

Our evaluation model was not the standard configuration – we had 32GB, not 16GB, the $ 3400 version. In Australia, there are no eighth generation Core i options, at least not yet, so the closest configuration has the same memory and RAM but the i7-7600U for $ 6,860. And then there is no 1TB option in the UK, and you have to choose between 16GB of 512GB SSD or 32GB and 256GB SSD, plus there is only the i7-7600U at the moment. The 16GB / 512GB model runs £ 3,556 but is not available; The 256GB 256GB model, the only model available, costs around £ 3,710.

It’s worth the extra money for seventh-generation processors, at least because they probably provide the best battery life – and that’s what it takes. I suspect that Quadro GPUs consume a lot of power, and integrated workstations rarely give up on workstations to extend the battery life, which has been tested for almost five hours. This is not a bad thing for a tablet with discrete graphics and a 4K display, but it’s a small consolation when traveling abroad.

Finally, its performance is very good against full laptops, although I don’t have much data to compare (we didn’t run the Cinebench tests that are relevant here on a fair number of competing systems). In practice, it felt as fast as a typical mid-range desktop. This is one of the trade-offs in terms of size and flexibility. But it never got warm, which is also important.

Battery drain test for video streaming

Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 984 Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 643 Microsoft Surface Pro 505 HP ZBook x2 G4 283 Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 243 Microsoft Surface Book 2 Tablet Partition (15 inches) 239

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance (in minutes)

Geekbench 4 (multi-core)

Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 15973 HP ZBook x2 G4 15060 Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 12940 Microsoft Surface Pro 8845 Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 3707

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

Cinebench R15 OpenGL

HP ZBook x2 G4 107.17 Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 91.19

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance (FPS)

Cinebench R15 processor (multi-core)

Apple MacBook Pro Touch Panel (15 Inch, 2017) 764 Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) 691 HP ZBook x2 G4 524

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

System configurations

Apple MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (15-inch, 2017) Apple macOS Sierra 10.12.5; 2.9GHz Intel Core i7-7820HQ; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 2,133MHz; 4GB Radeon Pro 560 / 1,536MB Intel HD Graphics 630; 512GB SSD
HP ZBook x2 G4 Microsoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U; 32GB DDR5 SDRAM 2,400MHz; 2GB Nvidia Quadro M620; 512GB SSD
Microsoft Surface Book 2 (15-inch) Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U; 16GB DDR4 SDRAM 1,866MHz; 6GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 ; 1TB SSD
Microsoft Surface Pro Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-7600U; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,866MHz; 128MB (dedicated) Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640; 512GB SSD
Wacom MobileStudio Pro 16 Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 3.3GHz Intel Core i7-6567U; 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,600MHz; 4GB Nvidia Quadro M1000M; 512GB SSD

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