Is BenQ EW2420 good for office

Monitors

The Good The BenQ EW2420 packs in tons of connection options for a surprisingly low price.

The Bad The BenQ EW2420 has a conventional design, has problems with dark color reproduction and covers films with too much green.

The Bottom Line With its many features and low cost, the BenQ EW2420 is one of the best monitors available.

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7.1 Overall

  • Design
    6
  • Features
    8
  • Performance
    7
  • Support
    8

We see that many LED backlit monitors come through CNET reviews, but what we don’t see is many LED backlit monitors with AMVA panels. This is something new, and the BenQ EW2420 is the first monitor we’ve seen on technology. Now, while we still prefer IPS panels to our monitors, AMVA is sneezing. As for the specifications, it offers a higher viewing angle and better color reproduction than the TN panel. The specifications are one thing, but the implementation of these specifications is another. The monitor is affordable, but those looking for a high-performance MVA monitor panel may be disappointed.

Design and features
From a purely aesthetic point of view, the BenQ EW2420 would have a difficult time standing in a room full of monitors. It has a typical black chassis, half-gloss black border on each side and an oval stand for 10.5 inches wide and 7.25 inches respectively. Honestly, I could describe about 90 percent of the monitors released in the last year; The EW2420 doesn’t really help visually flourish.

The screen has a semi-glossy appearance, and although it does not provide a 1: 1 reflection of the environment, the reflection angle becomes much clearer. The initial depth of the panel is approximately 1.1 inches, but the panel extends another 1.25 inches to enable connection and provide adequate ventilation. The distance from the bottom of the panel to the desktop is about 3 inches. Below the bottom panel is a thin gray cylinder that stretches the width of the panel – one of the few unique aesthetic blossoms of the EW2420.

The neck of the foot rest contains a cable router at the back that resembles an opening hinged receptacle. Unfortunately, overturning does not detect corn-syrup-enriched sugary drink that decays the teeth; just a place to lay the cables.

Each connection option is indicated by a clear mark on the back of the monitor. Connections include two HDMI ports, one DVI, one VGA, two USB downstream, one up and a speaker port. On the left side of the panel are two USB ports upstream and a headphone jack.

At the bottom right of the panel is an On-Screen Display (OSD) array. When viewed from the front, white text is displayed indicating the location of each OSD button. On the right, you can clearly see five vertically aligned screen buttons, about 2.55 inches in diameter and just under 0.5 inches apart. The buttons consist of Auto, Menu, Up / Volume, Down / Pre and Input. Each button convincingly presses and clicks the sound pop. At the bottom of the buttons is a slightly larger power button, which flashes orange when the monitor is in standby mode and glows green when turned on.

The EW2420 OSD’s default OSD modes are Standard, Movie, Games, Photo, sRGB and Eco. Each preset adjusts the color temperature and brightness of the display to suit your needs; for example, Eco significantly reduces brightness to save energy. In addition, there are normal, reddish, and bluish color temperature settings, and the RGB values ​​of the monitor can be adjusted individually.

Design and feature highlights
Connectivity: DVI, VGA, HDMIx2
Ergonomic options: 10 degree back tilt
Resolution: 1,920×1,080 pixels
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Audio: Headphone jack
VESA wall-mount support: Yes
Included video cables: DVI, HDMI
Backlight: LED
Panel type: AMVA
Screen film: Matte
Pixel response rate: 8ms
Number of presets: 6
Overdrive: No
Picture options: Brightness, Contrast, Sharpness
Color controls: RGB controls, sRGB, 6500K, 7500K, 8500K, 9300K
Gamma control: Yes
Additional features: n/a

Performance
We tested the BenQ EW2420 through its DVI input connected to a Windows Vista PC using the included DVI cable. The display shows a composite score of 90 on performance tests based on CNET lab displays.

The EW2420 was wrong on several of our color tests, including the color scale test. Color scale tests look for a smooth and linear transition from light to dark. Unfortunately, BenQ, unfortunately, showed a very obvious and non-linear transition, indicating that it may have problems with rendering darker colors.

Fortunately, the EW2420 was able to collect low levels of black by displaying dark gray about four levels above true black, and showed slight signs of white level saturation, meaning colors near the bright end of the spectrum were most likely not washed out. We did see some static streaks, but the backlight bleeding was minimal, detecting only in the lower right and left edges. In addition, due to the very low black level, the EW2420 produced one of the highest contrast ratios we have yet seen.

Text:We didn’t see any color issues with the black text on the white background in the text. The fonts were clearly visible up to size 6.8. We saw a lot of blossoming around text with blue and pink fonts on a black background.

Movies:We tested the BenQ EW2420 using the Blu-ray version of Avatar. Although we saw deep blacks when using a pre-installed movie, there was also a certain green jolt, most noticeable in the actors’ faces.

Minimizing green was a problem and we never got to the point where we were comfortable with it, but we list the best settings we could offer below.

Games:Through our close acquaintance with StarCraft II (SCII), it is our new favorite tool for assessing color quality and brightness in games. By default, when the game was pre-installed, the SCII characters were fuzzy and the colors oversaturated. We found softer and smoother results after switching to the sRGB preset.

To test the refresh rate, we used DisplayMate graphics motion tests and watched a bunch of graphics fly across the screen, looking for evidence of stripes. Compared to the Samsung PX2370, the EW2420 featured more prominent trim levels. Given that the EW2420 accommodates an AMVA panel rather than a fast TN like the PX2370, the results were not surprising.

Photos:The BenQ EW2420 provided photos with a noticeable green tint, especially when compared to the more accurate and natural faces we saw on the PX2370. Using pre-installed sRGBs or greening up to the mid-’70s improved things.

Viewing angle:The optimal position for viewing the monitor is usually in the front right, about a quarter of the screen down from the top. At this angle, you are viewing the colors as intended by the manufacturer. Most monitors are not considered in any other angle. Image quality at sub-optimal angles depends on the type of panel. Most monitors use TN panels that are too bright or too dark on parts of the screen when not viewed from optimal angles. Again, the EW2420 uses an AMVA panel, which provides a wider viewing angle than typical TN panels.

While the TN panel shows evidence of color offset viewed approximately 6 inches from the center, we did not see any evidence of color shift on the EW2420 until our viewing angle was approximately 10 inches from the center. However, the image quality from this angle does not remain as high as the monitor on the IPS panel, visible at the same angle. The biggest problem we noticed was that at such a wide angle the reflections on the screen became much more noticeable.

Recommended settings and usage:During the game, we found that sRGB is best installed. What you lose in energy with this preinstalled program, you certainly make smooth clean graphics.

We saw a low level of black in the movies, but we noticed a green push, especially when compared directly to the PX2370. This is not obvious, and many casual users will probably not notice it, but for the most natural look, we recommend that you go with the default preset above the movie preset and use the following settings:

Red: 86
Green: 75
Blue: 85

In general, we recommend installing sRGB for full use.

Energy consumption:The BenQ EW2420 achieved high power, default power / on power of 32.1 watts, compared to the 25.01 watts of Samsung PX2370 in the same test. In our sleep / standby test, the EW2420 received 0.58 watts and the PX2370 less than 0.27 watts. Based on our formula, the EW2420 will cost $ 9.98 per year to run, compared to the lower PX2370 $ 7.65 per year.

Brightness in cd / m2
(Longer bars indicate better performance)

Brightness

AOC e2243Fw
255 Samsung PX2370
246 LG Flatron E2290
244 Samsung FX2490HD
239 HP 2310e
234 BenQ EW2420
213 Dell ST2420L
207
Contrast ratio
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
BenQ EW2420
4,862:1 HP 2310e
1,110:1 Dell ST2420L
1,061:1 Samsung FX2490HD
983:1 Samsung PX2370
948:1 AOC e2243Fw
946:1 LG Flatron E2290
931:1
DisplayMate performance tests
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Samsung PX2370
97 HP 2310e
93 LG Flatron E2290
93 AOC e2243Fw
91 BenQ EW2420
90 Samsung FX2490HD
88 Dell ST2420L
87

Juice box
BenQ EW2420 Average watts per hour
On (default luminance) 32.1
On (max luminance) 32.1
On (min luminance) 15.6
Sleep 0.58
Calibrated (200 cd/m2) 29.1
Annual power consumption cost $9.98
Score Fair

Learn more about how we test LCD monitors.

Service and support
BenQ supports the EW2420 with the standard three-year workpiece and warranty, which also includes backlight support. As long as you are under warranty, BenQ provides free phone support on weekdays from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. PT. Currently, the monitor user guide, drivers, and additional software are not available on the BenQ website.

Conclusions
At around $ 240, it’s hard to blame the BenQ EW2420. Any imperfection that grows can be justified: “But at least it’s cheap!” While $ 240 is a really great price, it’s only going so far. Fortunately, the EW2420 is far enough given its features. With two HDMI ports, built-in speakers and multiple USB ports, not to mention standard VGAs and DVIs, you’re sure to get something for your money. While the combination LED backlight panels and AMVA didn’t deliver the performance we had hoped for, we saw wider viewing angles than the TN panels and much lower black levels than we saw on the TN or IP based panels. Unfortunately, the film’s performance did not interfere with the green impulse, but the monitor did a good job. If you’re looking for the best artist, that’s not all; However, for a general-purpose display with an amazing amount of useful features and a low price, it will be difficult to find a better bargain than the BenQ EW2420.

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